The acclaimed Silent Films / Live Music series, curated by WNYC’s John Schaefer, returns to the Winter Garden at Brookfield Place (BFPL) for three nights from Wednesday, January 30 through Friday, February 1 starting at 7:30 p.m. The winter film series includes three unforgettable evenings filled with classic silent film screenings accompanied by live music. Presented by Arts Brookfield, these performances will bring new life to films with scores performed under the glass atrium at BFPL, the shopping, dining and cultural destination along the Hudson River in Lower Manhattan.

The series will kick off with renowned American guitarist and composer Marc Ribot’s sound accompaniment to 1920s classic, ‘The Kid.’ Next on the roster is the U.S. premiere of Nosferatu by Irish composers Irene Buckley and Linda Buckley. Alloy Orchestra concludes the series by bringing the the world’s first gangster film, Underworld, to life with a new score. Popcorn will be given away starting at 5:30 p.m. and will be available while supplies last.

the kid

 

FILM SCHEDULE:

  • January 30: The Kid (1921) with Marc Ribot – “The Kid” is an American silent comedy-drama film written by, produced by and starring Charlie Chaplin, and features Jackie Coogan as his adopted son and sidekick.

 

  • January 31: Nosferatu (1922) with Irene and Linda Buckley – Irish composers, sisters Irene and Linda Buckley present a reimagined score to the gothic classic Nosferatu for organ, electronics, viola and cello.

 

  • February 1: Underworld (1927) with Alloy Orchestra – “Underworld” was the film that launched Josef von Sternberg’s very successful career. A favorite of audiences and critics alike, Underworld is credited as the first gangster film, and the model for the popular genre.

 

“Arts Brookfield is excited to present a timeless collection of films by award-winning directors to Lower Manhattan, ” said Elysa Marden, Vice President, Arts Brookfield. “We are delighted to provide a space for visitors to enjoy music and film in an inspired environment.”