Artioli Findlay’s Pauline Findlay and Rebecca Senior Answer 7 Oft-Asked Questions on How to Source Art

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Estate pieces offer visual intrigue such as in this living area by DOSK Interiors.

Founder Pauline Findlay, and director Rebecca Senior, of Artioli Findlay, offer answers to 7 of their most of-asked questions on how to source art with ease. Now that most of us (that are able to) are working from home, our interiors are getting that much more of a discerning look. And for many of us, a bare wall, or two, are begging for that perfect piece of art to tie it all together. Below, Findlay and Senior tackle some of the peskier questions their clients have wrestled with and offer some great insider advice.

Pauline Findlay.

1: How do I find a reputable dealer? Are there online resources to finding dealers near me?

Artioli Findlay: Look for dealers who have long term relationships with their artists. Also, look for galleries that are transparent about their pricing. Finding a dealer who is flexible about a return policy, and/or actually has a return policy, is important. To find dealers nearby, research various art platforms, including much-visited Artsy.net, where one can filter for galleries near their zip code. In addition, various art guides showcase maps and events in local areas online.

2: What are key things to look for when sourcing art?

Artioli Findlay: Look for galleries that are experts in their field. Integrity and authenticity is key. It’s also important that a gallery is willing to be flexible in terms of pricing and have a robust inventory from which to make your selection.

An original Marilyn Minter hangs prominently in a New York apartment by Kammi Reiss Design.

3: What are three things to avoid when sourcing art?

Artioli Findlay: We suggest avoiding galleries that don’t have a focus, are not transparent with pricing, and that don’t have an ample inventory of artworks in the style, color palette, and subject matter that interest the buyer.

4: I’ve found a piece that I love but am second guessing my decision—how do I know when to say “yes?”

Artioli Findlay: If you were drawn to a piece of art and continually feel good when you think of it in you or your design vision, it’s time to go forward and have that in your life. If it happens to encompass a color or subject matter you are consistently drawn to, the decision process becomes much more simple and clear.

5: I’ve just acquired a new piece at an estate sale. I don’t know the artist or the year it was made—how should I go about getting it appraised?

Artioli Findlay: First see if there’s a signature on the front or back of artwork. Does the signature match a signature found online by that particular artist? Does the artwork style match with the other artworks found online? Sometimes there is also a gallery label on the back. I’d follow these leads until I found the dealer representing the artist and try contacting them.

A large, gestural oil painting is not only the best choice optically for this San Francisco living room by Orlando Diaz-Azcuy, but is also the most durable option for the amount of natural light the space receives.

6: What are the best ways to display art in the home… and what should be avoided?

Artioli Findlay: First concentrate on choosing the room’s target art focal points. Select artwork which is a good fit for the physical space as well as the visual space. For example, a small scale piece of art on an enormous wall, would give the artwork a postage stamp-quality look.

7: How should artwork be properly taken care of?

Artioli Findlay: Any work on paper should be properly framed in a manner that prevents air and moisture from damaging the artwork. A print should not be placed in direct sunlight. For paintings, a stable temperature environment is best to avoid any sort of deterioration. In regards to oil on canvas, these works are often more forgiving in terms of sunlight.